Motion Picture Story Magazine (Aug-Dec 1913)

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148 THE MOTION PICTURE STORY MAGAZINE Hazel R. E. — Stephen Purdee was the husband in "The Thief in the Night." Harold Lockwood was leading man in "The Lipton Cup." That was Robyn Adair. Betty R. — Dorothy Phillips played opposite William Mason in "Value of Mothersin-law" (Essanay). Myrtle Stedman was the girl in "The Marshal's Capture" (Selig). Audrey Ingraham was the girl, and William Bowman her opposite in "Two Souls" (Thanhouser). Peggy O'Neil and Billy Emerson. Edwin Carewe in that Lubin. Harry Mainhall was James in "Fear." Yes ; Allen Holubar in "Two Social Calls." Harry K M. — Thanks for the chamois. That Costello car was a Cadillac? Dont remember the article you refer to. Bill Mattoon, — Frances Ne Moyer and Julia Calhoun were Daisy and Aunty in "Doing Like Daisy" (Lubin). Alice Hollister and Harry Millarde had the leads in "The Wheel of Death" (Kalem). That was Edgar Jones and Clarence Burton in "Louedog, the Faithful" (Lubin). Julia Stuart and Barbara Tennant were Julia and the little mother in "The Little Mother of Black Pine" (Eclair). William Brunton and Eileen Paul were the bandit and child in "The Bandit's Child" (Kalem). Lester Cuneo was Monte Ray in that Selig. Thank you. Scaredy-Cat. — I agree with you on the religion question. Your letter is very interesting. Jack Richardson has not as yet left American. Wallace Reid was Bill ATayne in "Her Innocent Marriage" (American). Helen Armstrong was the youngster in "The Husband's Mistake" (American). Rhodisha. — Your suggestion about putting the questioners' names in order is a good one, but we go to press in sections, and besides, it would take much more time. Carlyle Blackwell is still in Glendale, California. Kathern. — Mignon Anderson in "When Darkness Came" (Thanhouser). Her picture was used in July, 1912. The title was underneath the picture when you cut it out. It is Mabel Trunnelle. Alice Van T. — Cines prod u c e d "The Queen of Spades." Diomira Jacobini had the lead. Your verse is very good. ]Vly principal hobby? W^ell, if you must know, farming. I raise blisters, mostly. Dale D.— Thanks for the news. If Charlotte Burton is poor, is Vivian Rich? If Edwin Carewe is clever, is Kempton Green exceedingly bright! Wonderful! Haven't the name of that fumiy fat man. The players you mention must be on the stage. Lydia B. — Thanks muchly for all the clippings. Kate Bruce was the mother, and W. Chrystie Miller was the father in "The Little Tease" (Biograph). Yes. everybody loves W. Chrystie Miller. Mabel Normand was leading woman in "Barney Oldfield's Race for a Life" (Keystone). Mack Sennett played opposite, and Ford Sterling was the villain. M. Lugnet had the lead in "Mixed Pickles." Betty, Springfield. — Vivian Rich was the girl opposite Warren Kerrigan in "The Scapegoat" (x\merican ) . Yes ; Octavia Handworth. So y o u think the Answer Man old and crusty? Ah ! thank you, kind madam. .Johnnie, the First. — Thanks for the printed news. Very thoughtful of you. Will be glad to receive the Correspondence Club paper. DRAWN BY OUR STAFF ARTIST, AND HE OUGHT TO KNOW