Radio stars (July 1933)

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RADIO STARS where Clem and all the others are searching the ruins. In the play, l'ink arrives at the haunt- ed dark ravine that the mountaineers have avoided for so many years. Watch ! The sound man—Judge Street, they call him—reaches his right hand to a lever on that kiddie slide contraption. Only this isn't a kiddie slide. Where the kid would he at the top is a hlack hox the size of an orange crate. Judge Street jerks the lever and the hox teet- ers forward. A torrent of stones and gravel pours down the tin slide to the floor helow. The scrape and rattle of it roars through the room. Landslide! The dozing musician starts half out of his chair. The mike heside the slide picks up the sound and a million listen- ers are living through Pink's adventure. Cute, these sound effects, aren't they? Another one that you may have missed came when Clem was supposed to lift the top off a box. In every- body's loud speaker there sounded the authentic scraping of wood. It was Mr. Judge Street operating with a bow that was probably used for a bass viol before its horse hair strings were re- placed with a strip of soft rubber, drawing it across the edge of a fruit basket. Simple, when you know the trick. AT the fifteen-minute mark there is **a break for station announcements. The musicians saw their instruments as if glad for something to do, and then relax into a coma while actors and ac- tresses weave in and out about those mikes saying their lines. I wish we could learn more about these actors. Many people have thought that they came to the air straight from Carolina highlands. They are wrong. All of these people are professionals. Most of them have been on the stage. Louis Mason, still a most eligible bache- lor, was a matinee idol before he de- serted the footlights for the microphone. Ben Lackland, David, on the air, is on Broadway today in a successful play. Southerners they nevertheless talk much as you or I in ordinary conver- sation. Human folks, likable folks— when one of their number gets his tongue twisted around a couple of words, they laugh silently but heartily at his embarrassment. And so the play reaches toward its final curtain. Now, a strange man, found in the ruins left by the explo- sion, has just died. Clem and the oth- ers are talking about him. Pmey: "He asks fergiveness." Cracker: "We give him ourn." Clem: "And the All Merciful cain't be less tender to the dyin' than man." The women whimper before the mikes. Neil Enslen rises from his chair and takes a stand before his own mike. Tony Stanford is out in front of the actors with a stop watch in his hand. The sound man is silently put- ting away his mystic devices. Clem's voice sings out the final words, loud, sure, like the leader of a mountain clan. Enslen breathes deeply and makes a benediction of "This is the National Broadcasting Company." The 135th episode of Lulu Vollmer's "Moonshine and Honeysuckle" is over. ciiner J [a sensational offer} A neat, non-leakable perfume container to carry in your handbag —always ready for immediate use. These exquisite perfume containers come in six popular colors and make ideal gifts for your friends. Write for yours now! Just send your name and address with the top of a unit pack- age and 10^ (to cover cost of wrapping and postage) for EACH perfume container wanted. Use the handy coupon below. Snslanlly ... A SKIN AS SOFT AS VELVET Merely dissolve half a package or more of linit in your tub and bathe as usual. A bath in the richest cream couldn't be more delightful or have such effective and immediate results. Linit is so economical that at least you should give it a trial. Let results convince you! scented Perfumed unit is sold by grocery stores, drug and department stores. Un- scented linit in the famil- iar blue package is sold only by grocers. UNIT 0 DELIGHTFULLY PERFUMED FOR THE BAT> UNSCENTED The Bathway to a Soft, Smooth Skin | S THIS OFFER tlOOO IN U.S. A. ONLY AND EXPIRES NOV. IS. 1931 Corn Products Refining Co., Dcpt.RS-7, P. O. Box 171, Trinity Station, New York Please send me perfume containers. Color(s) as checked below. I enclose $ and LINIT packaqc tops. □ Black □ Brown □ Red □ Blue □ Green □ Ivory Name.. Address..